Posts Tagged ‘Transgender’

Beautiful Hearts

April 2, 2017

We attended the Trans Day of Visibility: Rally for Equality. I confess, I know and understand very little about the journey of transgender persons and what they have been through, though I know many and am educating myself by studying, listening to their stories, respecting their presence and rights, deliberately seeing them, and loving them. While I can never fully understand, I can understand better. As it was said at the Rally Friday, it is up to me, up to us to do the work of study and educating of ourselves to try and better understand what our transgender friends and family are going through and have been through. I am working on that, I want to better understand so I can be a better pastor, ally, advocate, friend, … a better person in my loving of all of God’s children…all of us.

trans

Speakers at the rally shared stories of loss and pain. Friday I heard not just stories of bullying and hatred, but witnessed it firsthand. I listened as speakers shared of youth and adults who have ended their lives because of religion, culture, and society who diminish and belittle who and whose they are, and I was moved to tears. I can only hope to somehow understand a small fraction of the pain and fear they have encountered on their journey, but I can be here for them as they make that journey, we can all be here for them as they make that journey. Transgender persons and their journeys, though filled with tragedy and pain, fear, risk, and struggle, are courageous and beautiful, all of them.

I think of that familiar passage about the anointing of David when God shares that God looks upon the heart. I can honestly say, the transgender persons I have encountered and come to know, have beautiful hearts of grace, compassion, courage, and love. I have much to learn from my transgender brothers and sisters that already has and will continue to deepen my understanding and walk with them as well as my walk with God in Christ. I am grateful and I look forward to a new journey each morning!

For our church, here at College Hill. The first of the year I had the congregation fill out note cards expressing what they loved about CHUM, why they came, what was our purpose. I shared those responses in our newsletter and we will be visiting them at our next Extended Council meeting. While we want to be aware and attentive to all the responses, the overwhelming nature of the responses had to do with our open, loving, welcoming, and inclusive posture and vision. We will be focusing on that and talking about how we can better share that message not only with our current membership but with our city and Annual Conference.

I want to emphasize my place here in this writing in that I stand with and will advocate for transgender persons, and gay, lesbian, bi-sexual persons, and those regardless of sexual orientation, race, gender, and age who are marginalized and oppressed. It is my passion, my vocation, my calling, and I believe what and who God with Christ has called me to be in this world so filled with brokenness, bigotry, hate, and exclusion.

I implore our society, city, state, country, and religious communities, to stop the discrimination and hate. Sit down with someone, talk less and listen more to the stories of those who simply want to live authentically as they were created to be. Here at CHUM, we are, and can be even more of a beacon of justice, grace, wisdom, and love. It is a beautiful way to join the beauty of this diverse tapestry of us God has created. Join me won’t you?

It is one of the many ways we seek to be faithful to the Spirit and one another here at the Hill, where you are one of the community, the whole community of God’s children!  Here where there is always an open door, a safe space, a warm welcome, and a place at the table.   Until next week, God bless, and know you are never alone.

Pastor Kent

An Ally for Caitlyn Jenner and All Who Struggle to Be

June 2, 2015

I have read several comments and articles at this point on Caitlyn Jenner. I confess there is some struggle on my part with the commercialization and sensationalism around the Jenner story as well as the Kardashians that has made me really rather ignore the whole story. And yet there is something that draws me to the reading I have done.

There is something within that hurts my heart to read the hurtful, hate-filled, and bullying type language expressed by society in general and in particular from those who profess to be followers of Jesus. And there is something inspiring about those who have expressed support and care for her as she has made this, quite literally, life changing decision.

As a straight, male, heterosexual I do not pretend to understand all that is involved with such a struggle to become that which one is destined to be at the risk of ostracism and rejection, I cannot, and yet I can try to better understand. On some minimal level I have on my own journey known the struggle to simply become and be present at this point in my journey of life and faith, which has not been without criticism and intolerance from some from time to time. But my experience cannot possibly be equated to the struggles, suffering, and rejection my friends and family who are LGBTQ have endured in order to be true to themselves.

That being said, even with my lack of understanding and experience, I can still be compassionate. I can still strive to understand more deeply. I can still be present. I can still appreciate the courage and depth of character it takes to embrace the reality of who one is at the risk of losing relationship, family, job, home, and even life.

So, I am present here on my journey to say I applaud Caitlyn Jenner and all those who are transgender, all of those who have the presence of mind, spirit, and body to claim who they were created to be by the One who loves us all without condition. And I am an Ally of not only these, but also those who live in fear of loss and violence who are unable to fully be in their world today.

I am not finished along this journey of understanding and I know I have those who will help me along the way to be a better friend, pastor, and human being as we are all immersed in the Presence from which none of us can ever be separated…the Presence of Love.

Pondering continues …

An Ally Along the Journey…
Rev. Kent H. Little

I Am United Methodist. I Am Here To Stay.

January 20, 2014

April 21, 1959, I was born into the family of James and Nadine Little who attended the Methodist Church in Douglass Kansas. Some months later the family traveled to Meade Kansas and my baptism by a family friend. I grew up in the Methodist Church and along that journey my father entered into the ordained ministry of the Methodist Church. He was in seminary when the merger happened in 1968 and we became the United Methodist Church.

Following dad’s graduation from seminary, as chance and the bishop at the time would have it, dad was appointed to the Meade United Methodist Church in Meade Kansas. At the age of thirteen I went through confirmation classes and at the end of the classes was called to the “pastor’s” office, as were all of the confirmands. I had been called to his office before, but it had always been as son rather than potential church member.

My pastor and I discussed the faith and what I had learned in my confirmation classes. I was never asked if I was gay or straight, if I smoked or drank, overate or cheated on tests. I was asked if I believed in Jesus Christ. I was asked if I would resist evil in whatever ways it presented itself. I was asked if I would support the church with my prayers, presence, gifts, and service. I said yes.

On Confirmation Sunday we spoke of the same things, we were asked the same questions, and still none of us were asked those questions of sexual orientation, lifestyle, or character. We all answered yes and were welcomed with joy and gladness into the United Methodist Church of Meade Kansas, the church of my baptism.

My own journey of life and faith was and is shaped by being a “preacher’s” kid. After high school I wandered away from the church for a time, wandered away in attendance but not who I was at the very core and that was always United Methodist. After TruDee and I were married we began to get back to being involved in the church in Johnson Kansas, to make a long story short I began to feel the call to ministry and though I ran from it for several years knew that at some point if I were to be happy I would need to answer the call of God for my life. I began my college education, received my first appointment in 1992, finished seminary in 1998 and was ordained an elder in the United Methodist Church in the spring of 2000. I am a United Methodist through and through, this is my church and I am saddened to watch it struggle to “be” an inclusive and welcoming church.

In my life, faith, and ministry I myself have been told by not only members of the United Methodist Church, but those outside the UM church as well, that perhaps because of my stances on particular theological and social issues that perhaps I should consider leaving the United Methodist Church. I have held conversations with members of the churches I have served who have felt the need to consider leaving because of the church’s stance particularly the negative and restrictive language in our Discipline regarding gay, lesbian, bi-sexual, transgender, and queer persons. These are persons who, like me, were raised, baptized, confirmed and have served in the UM Church for 10, 20, 30, 40 plus years, who have just as much claim on the UM church as I or anyone else.

I was raised, baptized, confirmed, and have remained connected and served in the UM Church for nearly 55 years as of this coming April. I serve in a United Methodist denomination who claims to exist for the purpose of Making Disciples of Jesus Christ for the Transformation of the World. A purpose which it has been suggested is more important than removing the restrictive language in our UM Discipline and being a church that welcomes, includes, ordains, and marries LGBTQ persons. Let me just say this, I believe the church is wrong, and not only wrong, but doing harm to the very disciples of Christ it has called to faith.

 
I am blessed, honored, and humbled to serve in a church that became a Reconciling Congregation before I arrived. College Hill United Methodist Church works tirelessly in service to our community, reaching the poor, feeding the hungry, providing resource and counsel to those in need, actively participates in the neighborhood and community to make this world a better place. The Community College Hill UMC is faithful in claiming and following Christ, resisting evil in whatever form it presents itself, and is faithful in prayer, gift, presence, and service.

As a member of the United Methodist church, birthed, baptized, confirmed, educated, and ordained, I take seriously what it means to work and live in a community of faith and in particular in the United Methodist Church. Removing the restrictive and hurtful language in our Discipline is not only crucial to living a life of Making Disciples for the Transformation of the World; it should be a priority in our work and place in the world.

Let me put it this way, as a clergy ordained and serving in the United Methodist Church I have promised to uphold the Discipline. But our Discipline is conflicted and contradictory. In one place it says I am to be in ministry to the whole church and in another it limits my call to serve the LGBTQ members of the churches I have served and the church I currently serve. When two members of the church I serve, who have been together for 15, 20, 30, even over 40 years and members of the church for 15 plus years comes asks me to do their wedding and I have to say no because they are of the same gender, such a response on my part because of the church’s stance is not only damaging and harmful to the very persons who have been a part of our community working to feed the hungry, care for the poor, comfort the hurting, and calling persons to faith in Christ, it diminishes the very purpose for which we as a United Methodist Church claim to exist.

I love the United Methodist Church and I am blessed to be a part of it and serve the people of the church and our Conference. And though the church is wrong on its stance regarding being fully inclusive of LGBTQ members, I will not be leaving. Nor will I encourage any members of the UM church to leave. I have been energized and recommitted to find ways to organize our numbers, our voices, and our votes until we become the church the Spirit is calling us to be. I will not be leaving, because the story of my life and faith is deep and strong in this United Methodist Church just as many of you who may read this, if we leave who will be left to participate with the Spirit in struggling and fighting for the soul of the church? Who will remain to live and work in ministry with and alongside our LGBTQ brothers and sisters who were also baptized, confirmed and serve to transform the world, for who this church is home and whom we love?

I am United Methodist called to serve the church, called to love God and neighbor, called to work for justice and love in order to Make Disciples of Christ that we may all be transformed for the work of Christ in the church and in the world around us that the walls of exclusion might fall at and by the love of God in Christ, and I am here to stay. I am committed to Making Disciples of Jesus Christ for the Transformation of the World. If you would stand with me in finding ways to not only Transform Our World for Christ but Transform our Church for Christ, to engage, share our stories, embrace in grace, and trust the Spirit to change the hearts and minds of those who would continue to hold our LGBTQ members captive and outside the ministry of the church I hope you will add your voice to mine and join me. Silence is assent and it is time to speak and be heard.

Peace and Light for Your Journey
Rev. Kent H. Little